AIAS Lunch Seminars 29 & 31 March on resp. 'Coding New Zealand collective agreements' and "Coordination on wage bargaining in the Netherlands"

29 March: Coding New Zealand collective agreements

Dr Steven Blumenfeld (Director of the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand)

Day: Tuesday 29 March 2016
Time: 12.15 – 13.15 hrs.
Location: AIAS, 4th floor Gijsbert van Tienhoven building, room 4.09, Roetersstraat 31, 1018 WB Amsterdam
Registration: Please send an email to register.
A sandwich will then be provided.

Abstract

For nearly half a century, the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (CLEW) at Victoria University of Wellington has made a considerable contribution to employment relations policy and practice in New Zealand. Since its founding in 1970 as the Industrial Relations Centre (IRC), a key focus for research conducted by academics and researchers affiliated with the IRC/CLEW has been the impact of any changes—both legislative and in common law—affecting the practice and outcomes of collective bargaining.

With enactment of the Employment Contracts Act (ECA) in 1991, the IRC/CLEW commenced tabulating, tracking and analysing the fundamental changes in collective employment agreements (CEAs) negotiated by trade unions and employers in New Zealand. Over the past twenty-five years, the IRC/CLEW has reported on trends and changes in those longitudinal panel data and on changes to New Zealand’s employment case law in its annual Employment Agreements: Bargaining Trends & Employment Law Update. The annual Bargaining Trends & Employment Law seminar series, held in locations around New Zealand, is also a legacy of that work.

This lunchtime seminar provides an overview of the schema used in coding and compiling CLEW’s CEA database and how data are presented in CLEW’s Employment Agreements: Bargaining Trends & Employment Law Update and Bargaining Trends & Employment Law seminar series. Trends in specific clauses and features of these agreements – including bargaining coverage and structure, term of agreement, wage settlements, working time and time off work, paid parental leave, and redundancy protections – will be considered. This will be followed by a discussion of how CLEW’s database has influenced employment relations policy and practice in New Zealand.

Dr. Stephen Blumenfeld

Dr Stephen Blumenfeld is in residence at AIAS as a Visiting Scholar from 11 January until 08 April 2016.

He is Director of the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (formerly Industrial Relations Centre) at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, a position he has held for the past 7 years. In that capacity, he has presented to employment relations practitioners on wages and conditions contained in the CLEW’s collective agreements database as part of its annual series of Employment Agreement seminars, held throughout New Zealand. Dr Blumenfeld is also responsible for dissemination of specific research findings through academic conferences organized by CLEW, including the biennial Conference on Labour, Employment and Work in New Zealand, which brings together researchers with an interest in labour markets, employment markets and the nature of paid work in New Zealand, and for publication of the CLEW’s quarterly CLEWed In (formerly The Employment Agreement) newsletter, its annual Employment Agreement and Employment Agreements: Bargaining Trends & Employment Law Update, and various research working papers.

Dr Blumenfeld has a thorough knowledge of and extensive experience researching and working in employment relations. He has researched and published widely on numerous aspects of this subject area, both within New Zealand and internationally, for more than two decades. As a member of the Editorial Boards of both Labour & Industry and the New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations and as a periodic reviewer for several international journals in the field of employment relations, Dr Blumenfeld is familiar with a wide range of research and evaluative methods, many of which he has used in his own research. His own particular research interests include:

  • the economics of collective bargaining and trade unions,
  • employment law and labour policy,
  • international and comparative employment relations,
  • regulating employment in global commodity chains,
  • decent work and job quality, and
  • precarious and insecure working arrangements.

31 March: Coordination on Wage Bargaining in the Netherlands

Dr Arjen Verhoeff (Senior advisor Dutch employers’ association AWVN)

Day: Thursday 31 March 2016
Time: 12.15 – 13.15 hrs.
Location: AIAS, 4th floor Gijsbert van Tienhoven building, room 4.09, Roetersstraat 31, 1018 WB Amsterdam
Registration: Please send an email to register.
A sandwich will then be provided.

Abstract

In the open Dutch economy the development of wages is frequently discussed. The confrontation of ambitions of government and social partners on a responsible development and distribution of wages usually is organized by the mechanisms of the tripartite corporatist system, the so called “poldermodel”. Many interpret the tripartite agreement of 1982, het Akkoord van Wassenaar_, as the start of a long period of socioeconomic stability. Recommendations on a macro level were translated into collective labour agreements (CLA, or in Dutch: cao). This process of translation from macro level into the collectivity of cla’s is called_“doorwerking” (including the so called extension of CAO’s, het “algemeen verbindend verklaren”). Has the process of “doorwerking” been powerful enough to withstand the dynamics of the current century? The necessary conditions for “doorwerking” to be effective are examined in a qualitative way in this paper. That is, the feasibility of a recommendation on a macro-level to be translated into the CAO-level. Furthermore, interprofessional stakeholders – employers (organizations) and trade unions – negotiating a CAO should simultaneously serve their own interest, and a socioeconomic interest. Since 2000, the government and social partners on a macro-level were confronted with a diminishing policy space. Moreover, the distance between the macro-level and the CAO level has increased. On a CAO level the risk has increased that companies will be less inclined to incorporate negative social effects in society: the negotiations within multinational companies, and an advancing Anglo saxon influence have impact on “doorwerking”. Finally, the trade unions, more specific FNV, were struggling with their position. In the period after 2000, the government and social partners on a macro and CAO level have certainly taken their responsibility in “doorwerking”. Wages have shown a moderate increase, few strikes have occurred, and socioeconomic outcomes are moderate. However, there are identified risks seriously weakening the process of “doorwerking”.

Dr. Arjen Verhoeff

The research interest of Arjen Verhoeff Ph.D. (1952) focuses on examining the necessary conditions for consultation and negotiation between stakeholders in a socioeconomic context. After finishing his PhD-thesis ‘No technical Innovation without Social Innovation’ the research program of Verhoeff comprises, among others, the development of a ‘Thermometer Labour Relations’, a validated quantitative instrument to measure the quality of labour relations within organizations, and the study of wage coordination in the Dutch polder model.
As a senior advisor at the Dutch employers’ association AWVN, Arjen Verhoeff is active in labour relations and is responsible for the interface between market oriented firms and academics. Verhoeff is developing discussion forums and research projects in cooperation with various universities. He is collocutor for directors of companies and sectorial institutions for the development, implementation and evaluation of social policy. Verhoeff has developed many instruments aiming to increase labour productivity and labour participation and implemented these in a large variety of firms. For instance, in 2013/2014, he has executed– in cooperation with many colleagues and firms – the project ‘2025 Scenarios Labour Relations’. In 2015, Verhoeff has coordinated the project ‘Entrepreneurship between Markets and People’ [Ondernemen tussen Markt en Mensen], aiming to discuss the license of firms to operate in the Dutch society. Currently, Verhoeff is associated with the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS) of the University of Amsterdam.

Contact details
www.awvn.nl
E-mail: verhoeff@awvn.nl
Tel: +31 70 850 8762, Mob. +31 (0)6 2224 1981
Member Researchgate, member Linkedin

Upcoming AIAS lunch Seminar

21 April 2016

Measuring employability and work ability in Germany – research approaches and data availability
Angela Rauch and Anita Tisch
Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany


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